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Physics

PHYS 100 Descriptive Physics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A descriptive survey of the important principles of physics. Not
recommended for B.S. students. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences).
Prerequisite for chemistry , physics, or mathematics majors: Physics and
Astronomy Department approval.

PHYS 102 Descriptive Physics Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, 3 hours. Experimental demonstrations, exercises, and field trips illustrating
the methods by which physicists have learned what they claim to know
about the world. Instruction is at the PHYS 100 level. Satisfies GE, category B1 or
B3 (Physical Sciences) and GE laboratory requirements. Prerequisite: previous or
concurrent enrollment in PHYS 100 or ASTR 100, or consent of instructor.

PHYS 114 Introduction to Physics I (4)
Lecture, 4 hours. The first of three basic sequential courses in physics for science
and mathematics majors . Introduction to vectors; classical mechanics, including
particle dynamics and fluid mechanics; simple harmonic motion; thermodynamics
and kinetics. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences). Prerequisite:
MATH 161.

PHYS 116 Introductory Laboratory Experience (1)
Laboratory, 3 hours. Demonstrations and participatory experiments are used to
increase the student’s familiarity with gravitational, electromagnetic, and nuclear
forces in nature. Applications include biological, geophysical, medical, and
environmental phenomena. Satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences)
and GE laboratory requirements. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment
in PHYS 114.

PHYS 209A General Physics Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, 3 hours. Laboratory experiments to accompany PHYS 210A and
develop the student’s ability to perform measurements of physical phenomena
and to increase appreciation of the sense of the physical universe gained through
experimentation. 209A satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences) and GE
laboratory requirements. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry, and a
high school physical science and previous or concurrent enrollment in PHYS 210A

PHYS 209B General Physics Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, 3 hours. Laboratory experiments to accompany PHYS 210B and
develop the student’s ability to perform measurements of physical phenomena and
to increase appreciation of the sense of the physical universe gained through experimentation.
Prerequisites: 209A and previous or concurrent enrollment in 210B.

PHYS 210A General Physics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A basic course in physics for students majoring in biology, geology,
or preprofessional programs. Fundamentals of kinematics, Newton’s laws,
work, momentum, harmonic motion, and an introduction to fluids and concepts of
temperature. Registration by mathematics majors requires Physics and Astronomy
Department approval. 210A satisfies GE, category B1 or B3 (Physical Sciences)
requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra and trigonometry or MATH 107.
CAN PHYS SEQ A.

PHYS 210B General Physics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A basic course in physics for students majoring in biology,
geology, or preprofessional programs. Topics include electric charges, potentials,
fields and currents, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. Registration
by mathematics majors requires Physics and Astronomy Department approval.
Prerequisites: 210A. CAN PHYS SEQ A.

PHYS 214 Introduction to Physics II (4)
Lecture, 4 hours. The continuation of PHYS 114. Electrostatics, quasistatic fields
and currents, and magnetostatics; electromagnetic induction; waves; physical and
geometric optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 114; previous or concurrent enrollment in
MATH 211.

PHYS 216 Introductory Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, 3 hours. Selected experiments to increase the student’s working
physical knowledge of the natural world. Prerequisites: PHYS 114 and 116. Concurrent
enrollment in PHYS 214 is strongly recommended.

PHYS 300 Physics of Music (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. Introduction to physical principles encountered in the study of
music; applicable laws of mechanics and acoustics; harmonic analysis; musical
scales; sound production in musical instruments; elements of electronic music.
Satisfies GE, category B3 (Specific Emphasis in Natural Sciences). Prerequisite:
one course in physical science or consent of instructor.

PHYS 313 Electronics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A comprehensive review of DC and AC circuit theory, applications
of diodes, transistors and operational amplifiers , and electronic test instruments;
electronic transducers; waveform generators; noise; logic gates and Boolean
algebra; number systems and codes ; combinational logic circuits; and applications
of circuit simulation programs. Cross listed as CHEM 313. Concurrent enrollment
in PHYS 313L/CHEM 313L is mandatory. Prerequisites: MATH 107, PHYS 210B or
214; or consent of instructor.

PHYS 313L Electronics Laboratory (1)
Laboratory, 3 hours. Laboratory to accompany PHYS 313. Experiments in this lab
are designed to address the major topics of PHYS 313 lecture course. Students
will experiment with physical and simulated circuits. Cross listed as CHEM 313L.
Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 313/CHEM 313 is mandatory. Prerequisites: MATH
107, PHYS 209B or 216; or consent of instructor.

PHYS 314 Introduction to Physics III (4)
Lecture, 4 hours. The continuation of PHYS 214. Special relativity; elementary
quantum mechanics; the Bohr atom and deBroglie waves; the Schrödinger wave
equation with applications to simple one-dimensional problems and to atomic
structure; elementary nuclear physics; introduction to equilibrium statistical
mechanics; the partition function, Boltzmann statistics. Prerequisites: PHYS 214;
previous or concurrent enrollment in MATH 261.

PHYS 320 Analytical Mechanics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. This course is an exploration into the principles of Newtonian,
Lagrangian, and Hamiltonian mechanics. It also includes a treatment of noninertial
reference frames, rigid body rotation, central force problems, and the dynamics of
a system of particles. Prerequisites: PHYS 114 and previous or concurrent enrollment
in PHYS 325.

PHYS 325 Introduction To Mathematical Physics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. This course examines advanced mathematical methods and
serves as a foundation for future courses. Topics include coordinate systems and
vectors, vector calculus, series expansions, differential equations , orthonomal
functions, solutions of systems of linear equations , matrices and tensors, complex
numbers, eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, Fourier series and Fourier integrals, and
use of mathematical symbolic processing software. Prerequisites: PHYS 214 and
MATH 261 or consent of instructor.

PHYS 340 Light and Optics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. An examination of the properties of light from geometric and
physical optics perspectives. Topics include ray optics, refraction, diffraction, coherence,
interference, and polarization. The course will present Fermat’s principle,
Huygens’ principle and Fourier optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or 325.

PHYS 342 Light and Color (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A descriptive, nonmathematical, but analytical treatment of the
physical properties of light , the camera, telescope, microscope and laser; holography,
mirages, rainbows and the blue sky; colors in flowers, gems and pigments;
and human and animal vision and visual perception. Satisfies GE, category B3
(Specific Emphasis in Natural Sciences). Prerequisite: any physical science course
or consent of instructor.

PHYS 366 Intermediate Experimental Physics (3)
Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours. An introduction to contemporary techniques
and problems in physics. Selected topics in lasers and photonics, materials science
(including high-magnetic field measurements and surface analysis using
scanning electron and atomic force microscopy), X-ray analysis, applied nuclear
physics, and adaptive optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 314 and 216, or consent of
instructor.

PHYS 381 Computer Applications for Scientists (2)
Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory, 3 hours. A survey of problem solving techniques
including computer modeling and simulation for the physical sciences. The student
is introduced to high-level programming languages such as C++ and various
mathematical tools such as Excel, Mathematica, and MatLab. Topics include modern
programming techniques, use of graphics and mathematical function libraries,
linear least squares data fitting techniques, numerical solution of algebraic, and
differential equations and error analysis. Prerequisites: PHYS 114 and MATH 211.

PHYS 395 Community Involvement Program (1-2)
CIP involves students in basic community problems related to physics and
astronomy—performing such tasks as tutoring, reading to the blind, service to
local, county and state agencies, and service as teacher aides to elementary
schools. Students receive 1-2 units, depending on the specific task performed. Not
more than 4 CIP units will be applicable to the physics major requirements. May
be taken by petition only.

PHYS 396 Selected Topics in Physics (1-4)
A course of lectures on a single topic or set of related topics not ordinarily covered
in the physics curriculum. The course may be repeated for credit with a different
topic. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

PHYS 430 Electricity and Magnetism (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. An investigation into the fundamentals of electromagnetic
theory and its applications. Topics include vector analysis, electrostatics, method
of images, magnetostatics, electric currents, electromagnetic induction, electric
and magnetic fields in matter, Maxwell’s equations, electromagnetic waves, and
potentials and fields. Prerequisites: PHYS 214 and previous or concurrent enrollment
in PHYS 325.

PHYS 445 Photonics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A practical examination of Gaussian beams; guided-wave optics;
fiber optics; optical resonators; resonant cavities; laser oscillation and amplification;
laser excitation; optical pumping; solid state, gas, dye, chemical, excimer,
and free electron lasers; semiconductor lasers; laser spectroscopy; fiber optic
communication; photomultiplier and semiconductor radiation detectors including
photoconductors, and junction photodiodes; p-i-n diodes, avalanche photodiodes;
and detector noise. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or consent of instructor.

PHYS 450 Statistical Physics (2)
Lecture, 2 hours. An introduction to statistical methods. Topics include ideal gas,
heat capacities, entropy, enthalpy, the laws of thermodynamics: Boltzmann, Bose
and Fermi statistics; and applications such as engines and refrigerators. Prerequisite:
PHYS 314.

PHYS 460 Quantum Physics (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. This course examines the Schrödinger equation and its solution
for free particles, potential wells, harmonic oscillators, central potentials, and the
hydrogen atom. Other topics may include Hilbert space; Hermitian operators; Dirac
notation; angular momentum and spin; scattering; wave function symmetry; and
elementary perturbation theory. Prerequisites: PHYS 314 and 325.

PHYS 466 Advanced Experimental Physics (3)
Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Advanced topics in lasers and photonics,
materials science (including high-magnetic field measurements and surface
analysis using scanning electron and atomic force microscopy), X-ray analysis,
applied nuclear physics, and adaptive optics. Prerequisites: PHYS 314 and 216, or
consent of instructor.

PHYS 475 Physics of Semiconductor Devices (3)
Lecture, 3 hours. A detailed study of semiconductors and their applications. Topics
include semiconductor materials, crystal structure and growth; energy bands and
charge carriers, conductivity and mobility; metal-semiconductor and p-n junctions;
p-n junction diodes, bipolar junction transistors, field-effect transistors, CCDs,
photonic devices, and integrated circuits. Conductivity and contact resistance
measurements; I-V and C-V characteristics of diodes; and characterization of
transistors. Prerequisite: PHYS 314 or consent of instructor.

PHYS 492 Instructional Design Project (2)
A directed project to develop at least one laboratory experiment and/or classroom
activity that teaches basic concepts in undergraduate physics. Both written and
oral presentations (including a demonstration of the experiment or activity) will be
required. Prerequisite: Physics 214 and 216 or Physics 210B and 209B.

PHYS 493 Senior Design Project (2)
A directed project to develop either a working prototype or a detailed conceptual
design for an operational laboratory device. Both written and oral presentations
(including a demonstration) will be required. Prerequisites: PHYS 313L. Application
form required prior to enrollment.

PHYS 494 Physics Seminar (1)
A series of lectures on topics of interest in physics, astronomy, and related fields.
May be repeated for credit up to 3 units maximum. Prerequisite: consent of
instructor.

PHYS 495 Special Studies (1-4)
The Physics and Astronomy Department encourages independent study and considers
it to be an educational undertaking. Students wishing to enroll for special
studies are required to submit proposals to their supervising faculty members that
outline their projects and exhibit concrete plans for their successful completion.

PHYS 497 Undergraduate Research in Physics (2)
Supervised research in an area of physics that is currently under investigation by
one or more members of the Physics and Astronomy Department’s faculty. This
course may be repeated for up to 6 units of credit. Both written and oral presentations
will be required. Prerequisites: junior standing and consent of instructor.
 

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